FIRE SAFETY TIPS

Make a home fire escape plan and rehearse it with your family regularly. Because house fires may start and spread fast, even a little forethought can go a long way.

Fire Safety: The Hard Facts

  • Home fires claimed the lives of 268 children in 2017.
  • Home fires are responsible for about 80% of all fire-related deaths, as they spread quickly and can leave families with as little as two minutes to flee after an alarm sounds.
  • Fires are a worldwide issue, not only in the United States. In 2017, more than 27,000 children died due to a fire or burned around the world.
  • Working smoke alarms reduce the risk of death in a reported home fire by 50%.

Top Fire Safety Advices

  1. Check the smoke detectors. Make sure your smoke alarms work on every level of your home, including within bedrooms and near sleeping spaces. Smoke alerts should be tested once a month and replaced every ten years or when the battery runs out.
  2. Make a fire get away plan and practice it. make a fire escape plan for your home that includes two exits from each room. Select a meeting location outside that is a safe distance from your home.
  3. at a minimum twice a year, practice a home fire drill. During the day and at night, practice a home fire drill with your family. Exercising in under two minutes is a good idea. That may be all you have to get out of the house safely at times.
  4. If there is a fire, get out of the house right away. Get low and crawl out of the house as quickly as possible if there is a lot of smoke after you’ve gotten if safe distance away from your house, dial 911.
  5. Invest in fire extinguishers whether its for your home or a workplace, these can be vital to stopping a fire before it gets out of hand. Whether its a co2 fire extinguisher, powder or any of the others (depending on the fire that is most likely to occur at home or work).

How to Make a Fire Escape Plan and Practice It

  1. Make a fire escape plan and practice it. Make a fire escape plan for your home with two exits for each room (ex. a window and a door). Select a meeting location outside that is a safe distance from your home.
  2. Determine who will be in charge of getting newborns and young children out of the house. If the primary caregiver is unable to assist small children, have a backup plan in place.
  3. Teach older kids how to use the fire escape plan. Ensure they know to “get low and go” when exiting the house if there is smoke. If required, teach them how to open windows, remove screens, and unlock doors.

In an emergency, get out of the house right away.

If there is a fire, get out of the house right away. Get low and crawl out of the house as quickly as possible if there is a lot of smoke. After you’ve gotten a safe distance away from your house, dial 911. Remain in the safe area until emergency personnel tell you it’s safe to return home.

How to Test Your Smoke Detectors

  1. Check the smoke detectors. Make sure your smoke alarms work on every level of your home, including within bedrooms and near sleeping spaces. Smoke alarms should be tested once a month and replaced every ten years or when the battery runs out.
  2. The difference between smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms should be understood. Smoke and CO alarms should be installed in your home. Smoke and CO alarms combine the two functions, but if you have separate alarms, make sure you know what each one sounds like. Find out more about CO safety.